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Beneath The Church Steeple

Pulpit furniture

For hundreds of years, followers of Christianity have gathered at a meeting place in the center of a township or city to praise and worship Jesus Christ. Churches were easily identified by a large, pointed structure on top of the building reaching for the sky called a church steeple. Church steeples acted like a beacon for worshipers, able to be seen from far away. Although these structures are a staple in many towns and cities now and are a familiar part of our skylines, those who practices Christianity originally had to worship in secret, often in their own homes or in small groups to avoid religious persecution. Did you know:
Many churches have a cross shaped design
Although each church or cathedral has its own unique factors, it is common for the alter to be at the front, with a wing to either side, and a long aisle of churchpews on two side to lead up to the preacher’s pulpit.
Churches were the most important part of a new settlement
In most towns, the church was the first structure to be built, and often also the largest structure to hold all of the citizens of the town.
Common church furniture includes an alter, chairs, and church pews
Many pews include kneelers in front of the bench -like seats, allowing worshipers to kneel in prayer. As hundreds of church goers use the pews and kneelers, over time it is essential to have them repaired and refurbished. An exception to the Christian tradition of church pews is Orthodox sects.
Religion is an important part of daily life for many modern Americans.
Recent polls indicate that about forty percent of Americans consider themselves to be “very religious” and more than half of Americans declare that they attend religious services at least on occasion, likely for high holy days and holidays.
Individuals who consider themselves “very religious” often lead more fulfilling and spiritual lives than those who do not put religion as a priority. See this link for more references. Read more blogs like this.




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